Tag Archives: nutrition

meet sarah: using nutrition to change lives in milwaukee

Abundance is such an important theme for Sarah—she wanted it to be a constant reminder for her. So it became part of her business’ name!

Abundance is such an important theme for Sarah—she wanted it to be a constant reminder for her. So it became part of her business’ name!

A few weekends ago, one of my closest friends came up from Chicago for the day to share that she had broken up with her boyfriend. She was still settling into singleness (with the happiest smile, I must say) and evaluating her next steps while deciding to stay put for a bit—with her job, her apartment, herself. Time for a little bit of dedicated solo time. And friend time. And really simple, solid advice: “I realized that I was blaming my job for unhappiness and stress—but a lot of it had to do with my attitude.”

While I know I have a lot of blessings in my life—my faith, family and friends—she helped me remember that day-to-day happiness is a choice. It’s a choice to adjust my attitude to point toward the positive. It’s a choice to take a deep breath when I feel overwhelmed, make myself a piña colada, and just keep moving forward. (Real life. Last Monday.) And it’s a choice to stay out late singing Space Oddity on the karaoke stage rather than sleeping. (I’m in no way saying I always make good choices.)

Sarah Philipp, 32, was born with an entrepreneurial gene—check out her cousin!—and also reminds me how empowered I am to take charge of my own life and body. She is a Milwaukee nutritionist who created a beautiful little business, Abundelicious, where she uses food as a tool for wellness. She specializes in anxiety and digestive disorders, teaching her clients (and hopefully you now, too!) the power of nutrition as fuel for our lives, our minds and our happiness. Continue reading

meet kimberly: chicago food entrepreneur

Kimberly Crupi Dobbins, Simple Squares, People with Panache

I asked Kimberly why she thinks her sweet Squares are successful. “People like the taste and the fact that it’s simple,” she says. “We’re very transparent—there are no fillers, no rice puffs, no highly processed syrups like agave. It’s just clear, whole foods that everybody knows what they are. If you had a garden—granted an exotic garden—you could find everything in your backyard.”

Food has become my biggest frenemy.

Four years ago, a typical day of food for me would have looked like this: a McDonald’s breakfast sandwich and Starbucks Caramel Macchiato to start my morning; Kraft mac and cheese for lunch; Taco Bell for dinner; coffee ice cream straight out of the tub for dessert; and, if I stayed up late, pepperoni pizza as a midnight snack. How I didn’t weigh 1,000 pounds is a miracle.

What happened instead was much more frustrating: My body turned against me. All of a sudden my body started rejecting all of these foods that were so normal and delicious to me—onions, garlic, apples, chocolate milk, creamy sauces, cookies. Everything made me feel like crap and came with a healthy dose of less-than-ideal repercussions. The most frustrating part is that, all these years later, I still have no answers. I don’t actually have any allergies or diseases or anything. I love eating and trying new foods, but I just simply can’t digest things the way I could before. It’s certainly one way to make a 26-year-old feel 86!

So the goal has been to pinpoint exactly which foods I can and can’t eat, and it’s really hard. While I know that list from my old life probably gives Alysse goosebumps to see (and we were roommates at the time!), I also can no longer imagine consuming any one of those things. Continue reading

meet gretchen: changing the food system in milwaukee

Gretchen Mead with Panache

Another awesome Gretchen win: She got her children’s school to stop serving chocolate milk at every meal and snack. “Part of what was astounding to me in the municipality where I live was the sort of unquestionable and accidental institutional racism occurring through the food system. It’s not intentional, but people don’t consider in a community like Shorewood that most of the low-income people come from the inner city, with a high and growing rate of diabetes within African-Americans. Students come here on the food program and have access to chocolate milk up to four times a day! Each has the sugar equivalent of a soda of the same size.”

“Today is going to be chaotic.

“We are trying to do a very big job, so if it’s not happening exactly how you thought it might, just go with it.

Continue reading